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Wisconsin Public Television: Tribal Histories

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The Wisconsin Union Directorate Film Committee and the Wisconsin Union Directorate Distinguished Lecture Series present a series of twelve 30-minute programs of PBS Wisconsin's series Tribal Histories. Recorded in the natural settings of the regions that native people have called home for centuries, the Tribal Histories series features tribal members sharing the challenges, triumphs, and time-honored traditions that have shaped their vibrant communities.

All twelve programs will be shown throughout six screenings and two programs will be shown at every screening. The titles that will be played are:

Ho-Chunk History (October 28th, 12pm)By the banks of the Lemonweir River in what for ages had been Ho-Chunk territory, Andy Thundercloud shares the oral tradition of his people. Thundercloud tells of a traveling people who migrated across the land to become many different tribes, of the importance of maintaining the traditional language, and of the wonderful way of life he has known.

Menominee History (October 28th, 12:30pm): Along the banks of the Wolf River, tribal elder and preservationist David Grignon tells the oral tradition of the Menominee people. Grignon shares not only who the Menominee are, but why theyre in Wisconsin, and how he is striving to preserve their traditions.

Red Cliff Ojibwe History (October 30th, 12pm): By the shore of Lake Superior, Marvin DeFoe and Andrew Gokee share stories of the Red Cliff Ojibwe. They tell of a history that goes back to the Ice Age, of the Sandy Lake Tragedy, of Chief Buffalo’s trip to Washington, D.C., that enabled them to stay on their land, and of preparing their children to face the changes coming in the future.

Bad River Ojibwe History (October 30th, 12:30pm): By the Kagagon and Bad Rivers, Mary Bigboy, Thomas O’Connor Sr. and Robert Powless Sr. share stories of the Bad River Ojibwe, from their early migration to the Lake Superior shores to a once-thriving lumbering community to the present day honoring of traditions through the drum, ceremonies, and harvesting the wild rice.

Lac Du Flambeau Ojibwe History (November 12th, 12pm): On the bank of Crawling Stone Lake, Ernie St. Germaine shares stories handed down by the Lac Du Flambeau Ojibwe. He tells of the migration from Madeline Island to their present location, describes how the original six clans were given to the people, remembers the volatile spear-fishing controversy, and explains the importance of passing on stories to future generations.

Lac Courte Orielles Ojibwe History (November 12th, 12:30pm): Recorded in the natural settings of the regions that native people have called home for centuries, the Tribal Histories series features tribal members sharing the challenges, triumphs, and time-honored traditions that have shaped their vibrant communities. In this program, educator and former tribal chairman Rick St. Germaine tells of the Ojibwe band's history.

Brothertown History (November 14th, 12pm):  On the shore of Lake Winnebago, Joan Schadewald tells how the Brothertown Indians unknowingly gave up their tribal recognition status and have been working for 30 years to have it restored. An amalgamation of tribes that were forced from the East Coast to Wisconsin following the Revolutionary War, the Brothertown cling determinedly to their Indian heritage.

St. Croix Ojibwe History (November 14th, 12:30pm): Recorded in the natural settings of the regions that native people have called home for centuries, the Tribal Histories series features tribal members sharing the challenges, triumphs, and time-honored traditions that have shaped their vibrant communities. In this program, Mitchell La Sarge and Wanda McFaggen tell stories of St. Croix Ojibwe history.

Potawatomi History (November 20th, 12pm): Along the banks of the Wolf River, tribal elder and preservationist David Grignon tells the oral tradition of the Menominee people. Grignon shares not only who the Menominee are, but why they’re in Wisconsin, and how he is striving to preserve their traditions.

Oneida History (November 20th, 12:30pm): From the flowing waters of Duck Creek, elder Randy Cornelius shares the oral tradition of the Oneida people, including their creation story, and explains how he has learned to navigate two worlds: the modern and the traditional. 

Mole Lake Ojibwe History (November 21st, 12pm): Recorded in the natural settings of the regions that native people have called home for centuries, the Tribal Histories series features tribal members sharing the challenges, triumphs, and time-honored traditions that have shaped their vibrant communities. In this documentary, Tribal elder Fred Ackley shares stories of the Mole Lake Band of Lake Superior Chippewa.

Stockbridge-Munsee Mohican History (November 21st, 12:30pm): By the rapids of the Red River, Kimberly Vele tells of Mohican life in the Hudson Valley of New York before their move to Stockbridge, Massachusetts, followed by their forced removal to Indiana where they joined with the Munsee tribe before their final relocation to Wisconsin. James Fenimore Cooper was incorrect in predicting the demise of the Mohican people.

 

Assistive Screening Accommodations for Patrons with Disability

  • Closed Captions and Visually Impaired Audio Description not available
  • Assisted Listening Device Amplification available

 

These screenings are intended for UW-Madison students, faculty, staff, and Union members and guests.

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WUD Film
film@union.wisc.edu

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WUD Distinguished Lecture Series
dls@union.wisc.edu

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