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Environmental Shorts & Discussions

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Environmental Shorts & Discussions

Film
Monday, April 19
All Day
Virtual/Online | live/online
Cost: Free
A screening of three environmental short films and then a discussion with the directors.

Join us on Tuesday, April 20th at 6:00pm for a discussion with the directors of three short films centered on different environmental issues. We will be making the films available starting on Monday, April 19th and until Tuesday, April 20th. The three films that we will be making available are the 2017 documentary Joanna Macy & The Great Turning directed by Christopher Landry, the 2017 documentary Water Warriors directed by Michael Premo, and the short film Come Home, Lay Down Our Burden directed by Susan Rockefeller. Reply to the google form below to receive a link to the films once the screening window begins. The films and the discussion are available to anyone who is interested. 

 

About the films:

Joanna Macy & The Great Turning

Joanna Macy and the Great Turning is a 26-minute film in which Joanna shares her understanding of these times we live in, when everything we treasure seems to be at risk. But it is not a film about despair. Instead, it is about the opportunity we have to come alive to our truest power, to "look straight into the face of our time, which is the biggest gift we can give," and to participate in the Great Turning.

What is the Great Turning? It is, as Joanna describes it, the shift from the industrial growth society to a life-sustaining civilization. It is, she believes, the third major revolution of human existence, after the agricultural and industrial revolutions. This one, though, has to unfold much more quickly. The good news is that it is, all around the world.

“The most remarkable feature of this historical moment on Earth,” says Joanna, “Is not that we are on the way to destroying the world — we've actually been on the way for quite a while. It is that we are beginning to wake up, as from a millennia-long sleep, to a whole new relationship to our world, to ourselves and each other.”

This is a thoughtful, and ultimately hopeful, film for anyone concerned about the future of life on the planet. 

"We imagine they'll look back at us," Joanna says, referring to future generations, "Living in these early years of the third millennium, and say, 'Oh, those ancestors. They were taking part in the Great Turning.'”

 

Watch the trailer: 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BUkoXMff1Vw

 

Water Warriors

Water Warriors is the story of a community’s successful resistance against the oil and gas industry. When an energy company begins searching for natural gas in New Brunswick, Canada, indigenous and white families unite to drive out the company in a campaign to protect their water and way of life.

In 2013, Texas-based SWN Resources arrived in New Brunswick, Canada to explore for natural gas. The region is known for its forestry, farming and fishing industries, which are both commercial and small-scale subsistence operations that rural communities depend on. In response, a multicultural group of unlikely warriors–including members of the Mi’kmaq Elsipogtog First Nation, French-speaking Acadians and white, English-speaking families–set up a series of road blockades, sometimes on fire, preventing exploration. After months of resistance, their efforts not only halted drilling; they elected a new government and won an indefinite moratorium on fracking in the province

Watch the trailer:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H7geZzFvU44

 

Come Home, Lay Down Our Burden

A new film by Susan Rockefeller inspiring us all to consume less, care for the planet, and imagine a new way forward. 

Susan Rockefeller is an award-winning documentary filmmaker, artist and conservationist. She is founder of Musings (www.musingsmag.com), a digital magazine that showcases responsible innovation and provides inspiration and action for a better world. Susan sits on the boards of Oceana, Stone Barns Center for Food and Agriculture, We Are Family Foundation, Asian Cultural Council, Peggy McGrath Rockefeller Foundation, David Rockefeller Fund, Land and Garden Preserve, and is a Mission Board Member of Imagine. Susan is also Principal of Louverture films where she has exec- and co-produced over 20 acclaimed films including Viktor Kossakovsky’s Gunda and Aquarela; Nadine Labaki’sCapernaum; and RaMell Ross’ Hale County This Morning, This Evening. Sue’s own original films—including “Bach Star Café,” “Food for Thought, Food for Life,” “Striking a Chord,” “Making the Crooked Straight,” and “Mission of Mermaids”—have aired on HBO, PBS and Discovery. Susan is also a member of the Film Committee at MoMA, Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, and the Council on Foreign Relations. She is an avid encaustic painter and bee keeper in the Hudson Valley in New York.

 

Google request form:

https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSe6l5leX1nkl-nhYMidC3yTtQb6Stny6yveDN7JETj3fSaDsQ/viewform

 

Zoom discussion link: 

https://uwmadison.zoom.us/j/92343588777

 

Join us on Tuesday, April 20th at 6:00pm for a discussion with the directors of three short films centered on different environmental issues. We will be making the films available starting on Monday, April 19th and until Tuesday, April 20th. The three films that we will be making available are the 2017 documentary Joanna Macy & The Great Turning directed by Christopher Landry, the 2017 documentary Water Warriors directed by Michael Premo, and the short film Come Home, Lay Down Our Burden directed by Susan Rockefeller. Reply to the google form below to receive a link to the films once the screening window begins. The films and the discussion are available to anyone who is interested. 

 

About the films:

Joanna Macy & The Great Turning

Joanna Macy and the Great Turning is a 26-minute film in which Joanna shares her understanding of these times we live in, when everything we treasure seems to be at risk. But it is not a film about despair. Instead, it is about the opportunity we have to come alive to our truest power, to "look straight into the face of our time, which is the biggest gift we can give," and to participate in the Great Turning.

What is the Great Turning? It is, as Joanna describes it, the shift from the industrial growth society to a life-sustaining civilization. It is, she believes, the third major revolution of human existence, after the agricultural and industrial revolutions. This one, though, has to unfold much more quickly. The good news is that it is, all around the world.

“The most remarkable feature of this historical moment on Earth,” says Joanna, “Is not that we are on the way to destroying the world — we've actually been on the way for quite a while. It is that we are beginning to wake up, as from a millennia-long sleep, to a whole new relationship to our world, to ourselves and each other.”

This is a thoughtful, and ultimately hopeful, film for anyone concerned about the future of life on the planet. 

"We imagine they'll look back at us," Joanna says, referring to future generations, "Living in these early years of the third millennium, and say, 'Oh, those ancestors. They were taking part in the Great Turning.'”

 

Watch the trailer: 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BUkoXMff1Vw

 

Water Warriors

Water Warriors is the story of a community’s successful resistance against the oil and gas industry. When an energy company begins searching for natural gas in New Brunswick, Canada, indigenous and white families unite to drive out the company in a campaign to protect their water and way of life.

In 2013, Texas-based SWN Resources arrived in New Brunswick, Canada to explore for natural gas. The region is known for its forestry, farming and fishing industries, which are both commercial and small-scale subsistence operations that rural communities depend on. In response, a multicultural group of unlikely warriors–including members of the Mi’kmaq Elsipogtog First Nation, French-speaking Acadians and white, English-speaking families–set up a series of road blockades, sometimes on fire, preventing exploration. After months of resistance, their efforts not only halted drilling; they elected a new government and won an indefinite moratorium on fracking in the province

Watch the trailer:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H7geZzFvU44

 

Come Home, Lay Down Our Burden

A new film by Susan Rockefeller inspiring us all to consume less, care for the planet, and imagine a new way forward. 

Susan Rockefeller is an award-winning documentary filmmaker, artist and conservationist. She is founder of Musings (www.musingsmag.com), a digital magazine that showcases responsible innovation and provides inspiration and action for a better world. Susan sits on the boards of Oceana, Stone Barns Center for Food and Agriculture, We Are Family Foundation, Asian Cultural Council, Peggy McGrath Rockefeller Foundation, David Rockefeller Fund, Land and Garden Preserve, and is a Mission Board Member of Imagine. Susan is also Principal of Louverture films where she has exec- and co-produced over 20 acclaimed films including Viktor Kossakovsky’s Gunda and Aquarela; Nadine Labaki’sCapernaum; and RaMell Ross’ Hale County This Morning, This Evening. Sue’s own original films—including “Bach Star Café,” “Food for Thought, Food for Life,” “Striking a Chord,” “Making the Crooked Straight,” and “Mission of Mermaids”—have aired on HBO, PBS and Discovery. Susan is also a member of the Film Committee at MoMA, Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, and the Council on Foreign Relations. She is an avid encaustic painter and bee keeper in the Hudson Valley in New York.

 

Google request form:

https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSe6l5leX1nkl-nhYMidC3yTtQb6Stny6yveDN7JETj3fSaDsQ/viewform

 

Zoom discussion link: 

https://uwmadison.zoom.us/j/92343588777

 

Presented by:

WUD Film Logo

WUD Film

film@union.wisc.edu
608-890-3000

UW-Madison Office of Sustainability

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