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05/19/20

Heidi Lang awarded grant for study on the impact of college union involvement on sense of belonging, campus climate

heidilang photoThe Association of College Unions International (ACUI) awarded Wisconsin Union Assistant Director for Program and Leadership Development Heidi Lang, Ph.D., the ACUI Research and Education Grant for her study of the impact of college union involvement on undergraduate student perceptions of sense of belonging and campus climate.

The grant awards Lang with up to $1,500 towards her research-based, mixed-methods study.

With this project, Lang says she plans to demonstrate that students of color not only belong on campus but that their presence helps ensure the continued success of higher education. She also aims to study whether college union involvement might help white students generate greater awareness of their roles as campus climate creators as well as demonstrate the role that college unions can play as campus community-builders.

An ACUI panel of judges selected Lang based on numerous criteria including but not limited to the originality of her study; the significance and relevance of her project to college unions; and her clearly defined research design.

“ACUI strives to become the respected clearinghouse for college union and student activities research to help articulate the value and impact of campus community,” said the ACUI team in a congratulations message to Lang and other 2020 writing and research award recipients.

Lang joined the Wisconsin Union team in October 2003. In her Union role, Lang leads program and leadership administration and advises student leaders in multiple facets of events and activities programming. Prior to joining the Wisconsin Union, Lang served as a residence life complex coordinator for a residence hall of more than 1,000 students at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Lang has a bachelor’s degree in psychology from Western Michigan University, a master’s degree in higher education administration from North Carolina State University, and a doctorate in education in student affairs administration programming through UW–La Crosse.